Akoya Pearls
Akoya pearls are produced by Akoya oysters in Japan and China. Depending on the size of the oyster, their size may vary between 2mm to 9mm. The range of color of these pearls includes white, cream, pink, green, silver, and gold. Akoya pearls are famous for their lovely lustre and warm colours
 
South Sea Pearl
These are large pearls, most more than 8 mm to 20 mm, produced by much larger oysters in the warm waters of the South Seas, in Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The color of the South Sea pearls is determined by different oyster types. White South Sea pearls are produced by Silver Lipped pearl oysters. Golden pearls are produced by the Golden lipped oyster. Their warm, natural golden color is said to be rarer than gold itself
 
Black South Sea Pearl or Tahitian Pearls
Produced by black lipped oysters, these naturally black pearls come from Tahiti and Okinawa and are approximately 8 - 16 mm. Their color combines blue, green and violet tones with the peacock green being the most popular. It may take a dozen harvest years to collect enough black pearls that match in size, shape and color to create one necklace.
 
Freshwater Pearl
Freshwater Mussels reside in lake, ponds and rivers. Smaller sizes of irritants are used in making freshwater pearls, which result in more pearls per mussel. It is much easier to create freshwater pearls than saltwater pearls. Freshwater mussels can produce up to 30 pearls at a time compared to saltwater oysters that can produce only a few pearls at a time. , The size may vary between 1mm to 12mm
 
Keshi Pearls
Keshi means "Poppy seed" in Japanese, and originally referred to the small size of these pearls. They are a by-product of pearl culturing and, because they are made of solid nacre with no nucleus, they appear identical to natural pearls. Usually they have a bright lustre with colours ranging from silver white to silver gray. With more and more large South Sea Pearls being cultivated, Keshi pearls are now available upto 10 mm
 
Mabe Pearls
A mabe pearl is a hemispherical shaped pearl which is grown against the inside of the oyster's shell, rather than within its tissue. Mabes occasionally appear in nature. Cultured mabes are grown intentionally, by using a hemispheric nucleus, rather than a round one; and by implanting it against the oyster's shell, rather than within its tissue. The pearl then develops in a hemispheric form, with a flat back. While in the oyster a mabe pearl is actually considered a blister pearl not a mabe pearl
 
The Beginning History of Pearls
Pearls have long been treasured and highly valued in many cultures throughout history. As far back as 2300 BC, Chinese records indicate that pearls were the prized possessions of (and gifts to) royalty. In India, ancient Hindu texts repeatedly refer to pearls, stating in one place that the god Krishna discovered the first pearl. In ancient Egypt, mother-of-pearl was used for decorative purposes as far back as 4000 BC, although the use of actual pearls did not come until much later -- perhaps the 5th century BC
 
Famous Pearls in History
Famous Pearls in History  
Pearls are among the world's oldest gems, and from the time they were first discovered, they have remained some of the world's most sought-after and most revered gems. Throughout time, there have occasionally been a few pearls discovered that stand out among even these rare gems. Many of these famous pearls, some of them thousands of years old, are still around to be admired today. These pearls are remarkable reminders of the rich pearl history.

Some of the world's famous pearls in history are :

The Abernathy Pearl

The Arco Valley Pearl

The Big Pink Pearl

The Gogibus Pearl

The Hope Pearl  
The Abernathy Pearl
This 44-grain, natural freshwater pearl, is the most perfect pearl ever found in the rivers of Scotland. A 44-grain natural pearl is a rare find, and even rarer still is to find a pearl of such outstanding quality as the Abernathy. This famous specimen is nicknamed "The Little Willie Pearl".  
The Arco Valley Pearl
Reportedly given to Khubilai Khan, the emperor of China, by Marco Polo, the Arco Valley Pearl is a baroque pearl weighing 575 carats, or 2301 grains, (78 x 41 x 35 mm) and is a white pearl with overtones of pink and brown
The Big Pink Pearl
Valued in 1991 at $4.7 million US dollars, the Big Pink Pearl is listed in the Guiness book of World Records as being the largest natural abalone pearl ever found. This baroque gem weighs a full 470 carats. The purported owner of this gem is Wesley Rankin, who found the pearl while diving at California's Salt Point State Park in Petaluma California in 1990.  
The Gogibus Pearl
This pear-shaped pearl was the largest know pearl discovered during the early 17th Century off the coast of the West Indies. The gem weighs a hefty 126 carats. It is said that King Philip IV purchased this pearl from a merchant name Gogibus who wore the pearl as a button in his cap in 1620.  
The Hope Pearl
Most likely the largest and most famous natural saltwater pearl ever discovered, the Hope Pearl, is an astonishing gem. The pearl weighs 1,800 grains (450 carats), or approximately 4 ounces! The Hope is a white, drop-shaped blister pearl, measuring approximately 2 x 4 inches, and ranging in color from greenish-gold on one end to white on the other. Currently residing in the British Museum of Natural History, the Hope Pearl was once owned my Henry Philip Hope, the one-time owner of the Hope Diamond.  
Facebook
youtube